Friday, October 5, 2007

Port to Port - getting the car there on time...


After going to bed late the night before, I had to get up early to get to U-Haul to pick up the dolly. Once I got there, I freaked out a little bit because I told the guy why I was there, and he told me he had to see if he could give me one because none of his dollies were working. WHAT?? They had better be working, because I refuse to explain to my husband why his car isn't going to the port today. As well as explaining to the grizzly bear that is my step-father why he took the day off to tow the car and now the car wasn't going anywhere.


Luckily though, they got them to work. We finally got the car on the road and headed off to Delaware. It actually went much much smoother than I thought it would. I only had to stop once on the way to go to the bathroom, LOL. Which for me is an accomplishment. Once we get to the port, it took a while to find the actual company, but that was due to roads not having signs (I took it as a warm up for finding places in Honduras - since it is rare to have street signs, LOL) but we eventually found it. No biggie.


The shocking part though was when I pulled up to the spot where you drop the car off. It looked like a junkyard. I had never seen so many cars that were inoperable. It shocked me. And 99% of them were going to be shipped to Central America. Maybe everyone else knows this, but I would never had thought of sending cars that were that bad off. (The picture above is one of the better looking cars on the lot.) I guess I never would have thought to send cars to Central America that were undrivable. I never thought it would be worth the money I guess is the better way to send them. But looking at the yard, I am going to have to say that I was WRONG. I really wish I had brought my camera though - not just my cell - I was that amazed with all of the broken down cars, I really wanted to take alot of pictures.
It was funny thought that after they inspected the car and gave me the paperwork, I went off to the office, and as soon as I walked in theybegan to speak to me in English, so I answered in English. After a little while, I accidently began speaking Spanish - without even thinking about it, and the lady was shocked. But what was funny was how quickly her attitude toward me changed. She wasn't really rude to me before - more indifferent I guess you would say. But once she realized I spoke Spanish, I became her best friend, LOL.
All in all it was an easy day - we left by 8:15AM and were back at home at exactly 1:00PM. It went much easier than I was expecting.

3 comments:

Aaron Ortiz said...

Many people can't afford a brand new car in Honduras, so used car dealers import damaged cars that they repair in Central America, or use for spare parts, another booming business. For a Honduran, a Yonker (Junkyard) is not a junkyard, it's the best source for cheap spare parts...and they're not free! The junkyard owners sell them. Sometimes it's cheaper toget a brand new part, but since pepole think the junkyards are cheaper, they get ripped off!

Catracha at heart said...

Aaron - Thats what my husband told me once we got home (he ws home with the kids, while I sent the car). Its funny that I had never thought of it that way, and I had never even thought that Honduras had junkyards. Why I thought that, I don't know.

I wonder if sending cars that are totally smashed up (the one pictured above can be fixed - a majority of these there looked like a stepped on soda can) is cheaper then sending one that isn't. That also is what suprised me, because if its 14' 11" or below its $700 to send it, and thats what I meant when I said I didn't know it would be worth it.

Everyday, I learn something new ;)

Honduras Sprout said...

We bought one of those cars. It was a mess when I saw it in photos but somehow they fixed it once it was here. Labor and surprisingly many parts are cheaper here. In the states, the car would be worth 10k and all in all after all the fees and duties we paid $7000.

Our neighbor also does this as a full time job.

I'm catching up on your blog here...